Posted in Diabetes

Yearly Work Health Risk Assessment-Almost One Year Since my Type 1.5 Diabetes Diagnosis

This week we had our annual health risk assessment done at work. It involves checking cholesterol levels, fasting blood sugar, blood pressure, waist circumference, and BMI to give an overall idea of how your health is doing and determine if there are any issues that should be addressed with your doctor. This day brought back a lot of mixed emotions for me as at last year’s health risk assessment is where I found out something was very wrong with my blood sugars. My fasting blood sugar at that point was over 170 mg/dL, which is very high. I remember we had to prick my finger twice as enough blood just wouldn’t come out to fill the capillary tube. It was probably because my blood was just pure sugar at that point because I was running high for who knows how long!

When I saw that result last year, I remember getting this awful feeling in the pit of my stomach telling me that this was probably only the beginning of a long journey down a rabbit hole. I remember being baffled and thinking that it couldn’t be right. Yeah, I was a bit sedentary as I do work at a desk all day, but my diet was pretty ok for the most part, I was young, and I wasn’t overweight. Even more confusing was the fact that I had blood draws a few times in the year and my blood glucose levels were always normal. I just did not understand why I would go from fine blood sugar levels to full-on diabetes blood sugar levels in less than a year without ever going through a pre-diabetes phase. Eventually though, after more testing was done, all the pieces started falling into place. I had type 1.5 diabetes.

I am thankful that my work has this done every year as otherwise it would have only been a matter of time before I ended up extremely sick at the hospital. I think all workplaces should have this service available for their employees as most people don’t go in for a physical every year and get blood-work done. It is a great overall assessment to determine if you really need to go talk to your doctor about anything.

I do worry about the people that shrug off a high blood sugar result thinking that maybe it was just something they ate the day before. People don’t realize how damaging high blood sugar levels can be if left untreated and may think it’s ok because they feel fine. I was personally told that my blood sugar was high and to just keep an eye on it. The person collecting the sample last year wasn’t a doctor/nurse or anything like that to know how damaging high blood sugars can be, but still, that is just awful advice! A fasting blood sugar of over 170 mg/dL is extremely high and needs to be discussed with a doctor ASAP. I hope other people that get high blood sugar readings do bother to bring it up with their doctor and get further testing done. I worry about all the long-term damage they’re doing to their body if they don’t do anything about it.

Anyway, my results this year were very good. They were good last year as well, except for the blood glucose. I was hoping I could pretend to be not diabetic and have a normal fasting blood glucose for the blood drawing. I woke up at 86 that morning and by the time I got my blood drawn I had flown up to 118 mg/dL. Thank you, liver! I try to eat breakfast immediately after getting up so I can catch this rise with insulin before it keeps going higher and I don’t end up with a 2-hr pp blood glucose level that is higher than I like. Since I had to wait longer before eating breakfast and I was already going up pretty fast, just ate breakfast and went for a long walk to try and make up for that rise that I wasn’t able to catch upon getting up. It seemed to work out ok and it was a beautiful day for a long morning walk. Helped me start out the day feeling pretty good.

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Author:

Hi all! This blog is a space to share my journey and day-to-day experiences with managing diabetes. Please note, I am not a doctor or nutritionist, just a patient that lives with the condition.

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